Killer Kenkey

By Ali

Challenge 3

Kenkey is a staple dish of West Africa served with a soup, stew, or sauce. Two days ago, brave souls of the RAINS office were given the challenge to be the first to finish two servings of Kenkey. Although I was no match to the Champion who ate it all in less than three minutes, I still managed to finish one serving in 10 minutes, and that was the second Kenkey I ever had!

Kenkey

What were the chances I’d live to tell the tale?
SAM_1149

Introducing…

…Team Tamale #2!

team 2

Fatawu and Zoe have been joined by 3 new volunteers – Iyanu (who has been given the local name Chentiwuni by our colleagues), Molly (Timtooni) and Ali (Nasara).

Over the next ten weeks you’ll be hearing from all 5 of us about our project at RAINS and our experience of life in Ghana.

Meet the team.

So long, farewell… and now there’s plenty of work to do…


IMG
With the end of March came the end of Phase 1 of International Service‘s project with RAINS, and the end of Tolu, Ben and Rhogan’s time in Ghana.

The three of them have been amazing volunteers and they’ll be missed by everyone in the office.

The placement ended with a validation meeting at which we presented the results of our Impact Assessment of RAINS’s Next Generation Project, which set out to tackle child trafficking and child labour, and to address the downsides relating to kayaye (headportering) and fostering, in the Northern Region of Ghana.

IMG_5729Our report included suggestions for how projects like the Next Generation Project could be improved. It also highlighted a number of opportunities for further work in the Northern Region of Ghana. The next groups of volunteers coming to RAINS will use this analysis to build on some of the opportunities identified.

And now, the end is near…

by Ben

And so I face the final curtain. This time next week the first -and best- ICS team placed in Ghana will be boarding a plane and heading home. Home to reality. Home to bills, rent payments, job hunts and so many other issues ducked and dodged whilst away for 3 months. But also we’re home to friends and family, real cheese and a meal without rice. While I will be sad to leave a country that has given me so many great memories and experience, ultimately, I really like cheese.

It’s strange the things you look forward to: After 3 months of soaring heat, mosquito nets and sweaty nights my duvet finds itself high up on my list of ‘Things I missed.’ Likewise rain will be a welcome treat and so will layers. I’d go as far as to say ‘layering up’ is one of my top priorities in the UK. I’ll be making sure my hoody and gillet combo is at the top of my suitcase. Easily available for those first wet, cold steps out of Heathrow airport.

Paradoxically I will of course miss the weather. Maybe not the heat and temperature but how can one not miss the sun? I’ll miss the goats and I’ll miss the adventures. Hell, I might even miss Tolu 🙂 Ghana has given so many great memories and grateful to have met so many great people: The other amazing volunteers I’ve been with, the people we’ve worked with at RAINS and IS and the people in the community often with so little and still so gregarious with their time.

With only one week left to go we’re preparing for our last adventure. We wrap up in the office today and we have one last day with International Service on Monday before we fly south to the capital: Accra. Here we hope to see another side of Ghana and enjoy their beautiful beaches, visit the Akosombo dam, see Lake Volta and visit old slave forts on cape coast.

Our final chapter, our final adventure. I’ve lived a life that’s full while I’ve been here. I’ve travelled each and every highway, but much more than this, I did it my way. Ghana, you’ve been amazing. Lets finish strong.

Greatest hits slide show:

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The musings of an African volunteering in Africa

by Tolu

Exercises in Africa

Tolu takes an impromptu lesson in Daboya no.2

Me: I’m going abroad to volunteer for a couple of months
Other: That sounds interesting, where are you going?
Me: Ghana
PAUSE
Other: Oh…..that’s cool

The conversation with a lot of people when I told them I was going to volunteer in Ghana usually went along those lines. Some would go on to question why I would choose to go to Ghana at all. Now this had nothing to do with the alleged rivalry that exists between Ghanaians and Nigerians (as I am Nigerian). For some it had to do with the preposterous idea that I would choose to volunteer in a country so close to home. If I got a paid job in Ghana, now that would be a different story – but volunteer?! If I wanted to volunteer, why not choose a more exciting option like Bolivia or Palestine? After all, Ghana is less than a day’s drive from home if I ever needed to visit.

This reaction is not unique to just me on the team I’m sure. Ghana being a safe, stable and relatively silent country in the media doesn’t make it a particularly exciting place to tell people you plan to volunteer. Take Burkina Faso for example; the very fact that a lot of people have no clue such a country exists makes it exciting.Couple this with the fact that it is facing instability due to problems unfolding in neighbouring Mali and to top it off, they speak French! I don’t know why, but the fact that their official language is the language of love makes it even more exciting than English which is the official language of Ghana. Is English even the language of anything?

However, it was not these reasons that made me seriously consider the choice to volunteer in Ghana; it was something entirely different.  It was the fact that I was an African going to volunteer in Africa. It was the fear that because I look and speak like Ghanaians, I would be overlooked at the expense of my white colleagues. I have justifications for this fear, as it will not come as a shock that people tend to look at others of a different colour and culture with a sort of curiosity and wonder. This not only translates to shouts of ‘white person’ as white people walk the streets but also large crowds flocking to them in the belief that they carry the answers and help they need. While this will not happen in every African country, I was haunted by the experience of my friend who volunteered in a Central African country. She told of her opinions being disregarded and those of her white colleagues celebrated despite them essentially repeating hers. The glorification of her white colleagues’ opinions over hers is not her colleagues’ fault but has to do with redefining the mentality of these Africans not only to see past colour but to not be essentially racist to their own race.  But that is a topic for another blog post.

It was stories like this that made me apprehensive about volunteering in Ghana. Being the only African on my team from the UK meant not being able to talk to anyone about it. Therefore I prepared myself that I would have to work harder to prove myself and show that I was competent of providing some valid and intelligent ideas. However, my time in Ghana has completely quenched my fear. It’s been the opposite experience as I feel that being African has allowed me to easily interact with the Ghanaians I meet both at work and outside it. I feel more confident in having conversations as I am familiar with some of their banter. Taking a keen interest in Ghanaian politics has also helped. Also, being mistaken for a Ghanaian works as an advantage, as it provides a conversation starter when I explain that I’m actually Nigerian. And while I still get disregarded in some situations, I am grateful that this has never happened at work. This has gone a long way to allay my insecurity issues and is a small testament to the development of Ghana as a great country.

So almost 3 months into my time in Ghana, my advice to any Africans looking to volunteer in Africa is to go for it! There may be various blows to the ego along the way but my experience has taught me that you see it as a life lesson and move on. While it is a positive thing that people from different continents are helping in the African development effort, there is the need for more Africans to tell and redefine the African story.

Time flies…

Validation meeting

Today we had a Validation Meeting at which we presented the results of our project report to 20 stakeholders including community members, RAINS and International Service staff.

Tomorrow, it’s our last day in the office before flying down to Accra next week.

This has been a VERY short 11 weeks… we seem to have lost track of time.

(Something that we must have caught from the Ghanaians we met, as most of them didn’t turn up until 1 1/2 hours after our meeting was supposed to start.)

Awesome Africa

Happy Red Nose Day!

I hope that all of you watching in the UK enjoy the entertainment and dig deep for those who most need help in the UK and in Africa.

But like I said in my previous post, there’s SO much more to Africa than you can see in charity appeals like Red Nose Day. So today, upload a picture of Africa onto facebook or twitter (#awesomeafrica) and show your friends what an amazing and diverse continent it really is. Here are a few of the pics we’ve received already: