Kukere II

By Iyanu

So far we’ve been enjoying Ghanaian musical delights and testing our dance moves here and there.  Music and dancing is everywhere in Tamale, whether indoors or outdoors, so you can imagine everyone’s curiosity when my Kukere dancing challenge was announced in the office. After hours and hours of channeling my inner Sasha Fierce hard work, sweat, blood and tears I was able to produce a performance of sorts. I pretty much brought the whole office to a standstill because of my surprising lack of talent!. Let’s just agree it was interesting because it was. I enjoyed it nonetheless and I’m glad to have seen my challenge through, the whole office has now been FIZAMED! 

(Note:Definition of  FIZAMED – To be  impressed with, wowed, surprised or baffled by the amazing team of Fatawu, Iyanu, Zoe, Ali and Molly!)

Kukere challenge

Kukere challenge

Clap-clap!

by Zoe

Walk through any residential street in Tamale (or indeed any other settlement in Ghana) and you are bound to hear a clap-clap! clap-clap! sound, from girls playing what must be the most popular playground game in Ghana…

It’s always played by two girls; as far as we can understand, one girl wins if you both kick out the same foot as each other, while the other one wins if you kick out opposite feet.

The game is exceptional training in co-ordination and timing. Forget patting your head and rubbing your belly; try clapping, jumping and kicking in time with these girls…. it’s nigh-on impossible.

Killer Kenkey

By Ali

Challenge 3

Kenkey is a staple dish of West Africa served with a soup, stew, or sauce. Two days ago, brave souls of the RAINS office were given the challenge to be the first to finish two servings of Kenkey. Although I was no match to the Champion who ate it all in less than three minutes, I still managed to finish one serving in 10 minutes, and that was the second Kenkey I ever had!

Kenkey

What were the chances I’d live to tell the tale?
SAM_1149

Ugly noise or media freedom?

by Fatawu

Daily Graphic Ghana3 May is a date set aside every year by the UN to celebrate the contribution of the press to the socio-economic development of humanity and to award a deserving individual who might have contributed in one or more ways to the emancipation of the media. This memorable day was marked worldwide with fora and public lectures.

In Ghana, such occasion was marked with symposia organized by the stakeholders of media freedom. In Ghana, this coincided with a report about an investigation into the alleged brutal attack on a journalist by the military during the Independence Day celebration. It was therefore expected that most of the commentary run on that particular day would be targeted at condemning the draconian act of the military, more especially it happened as on the august occasion of the nation’s Independence Day celebration.

Ghana, as a country with an estimated population of 25million people, can boast of 256 radio stations, 16 registered TV stations and numerous newspapers providing information, education and entertainment to the populace. This means that each region has, on average, about 25 radio stations and 1.6 TV stations. Because of the rural nature of Ghana, coupled with considerably high illiteracy and poverty, about 87% of the populace gets their information from radio stations.

Nonetheless, Ghana did was not given this state of affairs on silver platter; people were incarcerated without trial and even had to die for Ghana to get to where we are now. The most notable breakthrough in the annals of media history in Ghana liberalisation of the air waves and the repeal of the criminal libel law in 2001.The effect of this repeal has been captured by a statement made by Nana Akuffo Addo, the man under whose tenure as Attorney General this repeal was made possible. According to Nana Addo, the repeal of these laws has contributed to the growth of a vibrant and critical media that has won Ghana the reputation of having one of the most media friendly and liberal climates on the continent and has contributed significantly to the deepening of democracy in Ghana.

The repeal brought along with it several abuses: most of the media houses employ people who parade themselves on the street misinforming people instead of informing them. As if this is not enough, they assassinate anybody’s characters  unduly provided they hate your face; as most of the stories they publish are done without paying much attention to their own code of ethics they so subscribed to. The multi- million cedi question that easily comes to mind is; who regulates content of these media profession? Most of the stories they report lack in-depth analysis. Most of these abuses are again captured by the same persons who champion media pluralism. Nana Addo opined that excesses and acts of unprofessional conduct by the media, some of which cannot be justified under any circumstance, have partly given a bad name to sections of the Ghanaian media and provided the ready ammunition to authoritarian and anti-democratic forces to call for the reintroduction of the criminal and seditious libel laws.

Jurassic pork

home hog roastWe went to visit the Bolgatanga team at the weekend, and they roasted us a pig in the garden! Have you ever sausage a tasty looking meal? Of kosher haven’t!

Here’s a picture of Molly hogging the glory by helping to baste just as I was taking a photo. What a babe. I’d have done the same but it’snout my sty-le.

Ok, we’d best stop slaughtering these puns before you get boared. Hopefully we won’t barn in hell for them…

Where do we go…?

By Fatawu

Doctors strike Ghana

Members of the Ghana Medical Association have been on strike since 8 April.

I never imagined that the current strike in Ghana by medical doctors could have had dire consequences like this until I became a victim to this power play between the Ghanaian Government on one hand and the medical professionals on the other hand. I believe that those who wrote our labour laws did not make any mistake when they categorised certain services, including medical services, as being essential.

According the labour laws of Ghana, those who are categorised as essential are not supposed to go on strike – but should they continue to work to detriment of their conditions when all supposed avenues to addressing their grievances have proved futile and unhelpful? Your guess is as good as mine.

Personally, I am not so much concerned about who is right or wrong; I am more interested in what the innocent poor villager would have to go through under this difficult condition. As a subscriber to the National Health Insurance Scheme, a social policy meant to cushion people when they fall ill, I majestically walked into the hospital to be treated for the malaria that I have been battling for some time now. The moment I got to the hospital, I could see hundreds of destitute parents and their children lying on the ground waiting to access health care services.

I made an enquiry at the front desk as to why these helpless souls were lying unattended, only to be told that there was nobody around to attend to them. I pushed for more answers as I ran out of patience. All the front desk officer could do was to direct me to the administrator of the hospital. The administrator told me that the hospital was in that state because there wasn’t any doctor to attend to these patients – including myself – because the doctors are on strike.

At this point, I wasn’t looking at myself as a patient, because I could still go to the private hospital and access good health care services. I was so much touched by the condition of the innocent and helpless children and their parents who have no option at all. So I ask myself, so why do we have this situation in modern Ghana? Why should it get to this extent? Is there any end in sight? I don’t know…