Challenge week complete

By Molly

So, it seems that surviving in Ghana without the luxury of carbohydrate foods is actually possible. Who would have thought?

To say that it was easy would be a lie – not only because we spent the majority of the week with very little energy but because of the sheer inconvenience it caused to have a no carb diet in a country that is so dependent on the food group.

This was especially difficult at lunch times. Our fellow team mates would stroll around the corner to the rice man and tuck in to their fried rice and chicken while myself and Zoe would be roaming the streets looking for something we were actually allowed to eat. The majority of lunch times would consist of meat on a stick and some fruit (followed by a look of utter confusion by any Ghanaian that happened to walked by).

lunch time delights

lunch time delights

Leftover beans brought to work in a butter pot... Casual

On a more positive note – being unable to eat carbohydrates meant that we became a lot more adventurous with our meals at home. Our weekly market shop actually had some order to it and we even made a meal plan for the week.

home made chicken soup

Every cloud really does have a silver lining…

A fruity language

pineapple Ghana Tamale Dagbani alaafee

How are you? Pineapple.

We’re not pros when it comes to Dagbani, the local language in Tamale, but we’ve got the standard greetings down. And we know that the answer to ‘How are you?’ or in fact the answer to any question asking ‘how is/was..’ (how was your weekend, how is your family, etc.) is ‘Alaafee’ – meaning, or so we thought, ‘fine’…

But it turns out that, bizarrely, ‘alaafee‘ also means ‘pineapple.’

I now intend to carry a pineapple around with me all the time, and proffer it as a response to all questions about my well-being…