Pipe dreams

by Tolu

water pipes Tamale GhanaWe moved into a new house in Tamale and the initial excitement of living in a humongous brand new house has quickly worn off. We’ve had no furniture, fridge, kitchen utensils, and to top it off no running water.

Being without water quickly gets you to appreciate the little things in life such as making a cup of tea, washing your feet after a dusty harmattan day and flushing the toilet. In moaning about our misfortunes, a joke was made about how our right to water was being infringed upon. But we clearly know that all we have to do is kick up a fuss, apply some pressure to the landlady and water will come gushing out of the taps. Not that this has worked for us as we’ve now been for almost a week without water, but we live in hope and expectation.

However, for a lot of people in Ghana, a steady supply of water is an intermittent luxury with little hope of a quick remedy. Tamale (where we are currently based) is one of the fastest growing cities in the country; the demand for water is around three times more than supply. The dry season makes water supply even more erratic, with households going more than a week without any water and in some extreme situations, up to a month.

The lack of adequate water supply has more far reaching consequences than not being able to have a shower or make a cup of tea.  It disrupts the education of children if they have to travel far to access water in the mornings, it affects healthcare if hospitals are also subject to water shortages and sanitation also suffers which brings on its own consequences.

The Human Right to Water has proved controversial in international law and was only formally acknowledged by the UN General Assembly in 2010.  Up until this point, there was no legal oligation on states to fulfil this right, merely a political acknowledgement that it existed.

The Ghanaian constitution does not explicitly contain a right to water, but Ghana has shown commitment by ratifying the 2006 Abuja Declaration where it pledged to promote this right. The Government also met its aim to reduce the number of people without water supply by 85% by 2015 in time for the Millennium Developments Goals deadline, ahead of the designated target set by the UN of 78%.

In addition, development organisations are working in northern Ghana to establish a better water supply for communities. There is clearly a desire for improvement and the new term of President Mahama inspires hope that even more positive change will be seen in the Northern region of the country.

For a more detailed explanation of the issues in this post, check out the Water Aid website.

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2 thoughts on “Pipe dreams

  1. I don’t know where I read it or heard about it, but the introduction of the ubiqutious plastic buckets into Africa has meant that children can now carry water, as before the metal buckets full of water were too heavy for children. Depressing indeed, and something we in the first world take as an absolute given.

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